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FLU -What Parents Should Know

September 27, 2021 | Flu | 0 comments | Author:

INFLUENZA (also known as flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat and lungs. Flu is different from a cold, and usually comes on suddenly. Each year flu viruses cause millions of illnesses, hundreds of thousands of hospital stays and thousands or tens of thousands of deaths in the United States.

Flu can be very dangerous for children. CDC estimates that between 6,000 and 26,000 children younger than 5 years have been hospitalized each year in the United States because of influenza. The flu vaccine is safe and helps protect children from flu.

What parents should know

How serious is flu?

While flu illness can vary from mild to severe, children often need medical care because of flu. Children younger than 5 years and children of any age with certain long-term health problems are at high risk of flu complications like pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus and ear infections. Some health problems that are known to make children more vulnerable to flu include asthma, diabetes and disorders of the brain or nervous system.

How does flu spread?

Flu viruses are thought to spread mainly by droplets made when someone with flu coughs, sneezes or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people nearby. A person also can get fl by touching something that has fl virus on it and then touching their mouth, eyes, or nose.

What are flu symptoms?

Flu symptoms can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose,

body aches, headache, chills, feeling tired and sometimes vomiting and diarrhea (more common in children than adults). Some people with the flu will not have a fever.

Protect your child

How can I protect my child from flu

The first and best way to protect against flu is to get a yearly flu vaccine for yourself and your child.

  • Flu vaccination is recommended for everyone 6 months and older every year.
  • It’s especially important that young children and children with certain long-term health problems get vaccinated.
  • Caregivers of children at high risk of flu complications should get a flu vaccine. (Babies younger than 6 months are at high risk for serious flu complications but too young to get a flu vaccine.)
  • Pregnant women should get a flu vaccine to protect themselves and their baby from flu. Research shows that flu vaccination protects the baby from flu for several months after birth.
  • Flu viruses are constantly changing and so flu vaccines are updated often to protect against the flu viruses that research indicates are most likely to cause illness during the upcoming flu season.

There are still appointments available for our Saturday flu clinics on October 2 & 16, and our weekday flu clinics on Tuesdays and Thursdays between 8:15-9:00 and 3:45-4:30.  Help keep flu out of your household this season. Call today to reserve a spot for your child.  941-552-8341.

For more information call us or visit www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/children.htm